The Berry Prairie Blog

Native Biodiversity in a Rooftop Landscape


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Sep 8, 2014, 7:15 PM
The Berry Prairie is transforming. Gone is the flat landscape that was, here are the hills and plains of the new roof. The plants we bought new (as opposed to transplanted off of the roof) all arrived late last week, and today we began laying them out. We are creating three distinct planting zones: alpine (mountains), foothills and plains/prairie. The planting begins in the morning tomorrow!
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Aug 26, 2014, 7:30 PM
The roof redesign is starting to take shape - literally! Today's project was to install the first of the berms that the new roof will showcase.
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Aug 22, 2014, 7:39 PM
All of the plants on the green roof are officially dug up!
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Aug 20, 2014, 7:44 PM
Almost half way done removing the plants from the roof:
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Aug 19, 2014, 8:02 PM
Today is the first day of the Berry Prairie remodel! We are disposing of all of the dead plants that didn't survive the Roofing Fiasco of 2012, taking the live plants off the roof and putting them into a nursery in the meantime, and then changing the landscape of the roof.
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Aug 14, 2014, 7:49 PM
The signs of progress.
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Jul 24, 2014, 8:31 PM
The green roof is actually looking green! Thanks to extra rain this month and a bit extra irrigation, the roof is living up to its name. Nice to see it looking happy. The roof remodel starts next month!
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Jul 1, 2014, 8:39 PM
The Berry Prairie continues to bloom this summer, blissfully unaware of the changes about to come. If it knew, I'm sure it'd be as excited as the rest of us! We received one bid for the green roof remodel, and we're now talking with that contractor to figure out what we will and won't do in that process. Once the contract is signed, you will get ALL SORTS of news about it! But: no putting the cart before the horse.
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Jun 5, 2014, 8:47 PM
Last summer our garden intern, Jenna Ramunno, started a project that looked at propagating Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja spp.) with four different types of host plants to see which host plant best serves the paintbrush. In case you haven't read, Indian Paintbrush are hemi-parasites, meaning they attach their roots the the roots of another plant to siphon off some water and maybe nutrients. Without a host plant, paintbrush would be able to survive, but likely not bloom. It doesn't hurt the host plant, but gives the paintbrush some extra blooming power!
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Jun 2, 2014, 3:44 PM
We have two white beauties blooming on the green roof right now.

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